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Flutopedia Symposium

References

Flutopedia cites original sources where possible. The pages that follow provide and extensive list of those sources, as well as additional that provide a bibliography of material relating to the subject of Flutopedia.

Please realize that this reference list is also an expression of my research interests in the area of flutes and music in general. You may find extensive references in one area (for example, the oldest music transcriptions from the Babylonian cultures) and you may find other areas under-represented.

If you know of additional references that are not listed on these pages, please contact me.

The References

The actual references are broken down based on the first letter of the citation tag:

 A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z 

References are also broken down by category:

The rest of this main references page describes the details of how references are cited:

Citation Tags

Each reference citation begins with a unique citation tag that identifies the reference within Flutopedia. For example: [Densmore 1929].

Citation tags are made up of the last name of the first author/creator and the year of publication. For consistency and ease of publication on various media, the citation tag uses only the 26 characters of the Latin alphabet (uppercase and lower) and Arabic numerals. Diacritical marks and characters that are not in the Latin alphabet and are not Arabic numerals are converted to the Latin alphabet. For example, Marie-Françoise Guédon's paper is cited as [Guedon 1972] and the book of Simon O'Dwyer is [ODwyer 2004].

In some cases, the last names have been modified in the citation tag to match common usage. For example, Francis La Flesche's 1925 paper “The Osage Tribe” carries the citation tag [LaFlesche 1925] (although his last name is technically “Flesche”).

Character Sets

Some references use the special character sets of the languages of those cultures. To handle this myriad of special characters, these references use Unicode characters.

There is often a wide variation in the use of special characters in the titles of publications. I have preserved the use of these special characters, where possible, in these citations. However, this can create some issues depending on the software you are using. If you search for the phrase “Zuni” (no tilde on the n), your software may not find a match with titles containing “Zuñi” (the ñ with a tilde).

Alterations of Citations

In the interests of consistency and ease of reading, these changes have been made when creating citations:

  • Titles of works have been converted to a standard convention of capitalization.
  • Roman numeral designations (eg. XVI, MCMXLVIII) for volume numbers, years, and similar items have been converted into Arabic numerals (eg. Volume 16, 1948).
  • Authors are cited as listed in the original publication. In addition, their full name is provided, where known. For example: A. D. {Anne Draffkorn} Kilmer.

ISBN, ISSN, EISBN, and EISSN Citations

The ISBN (“International Standard Book Number”) and ISSN (“International Standard Serial Number”) systems allow books and periodicals to be uniquely identified. The EISBN and EISSN systems (also called eISBN and eISSN) are extensions of the ISBN and ISSN systems for electronic publications.

The ISBN system is overseen by the International ISBN Agency and has been in use since about 1970. It uses a 10 digit number, including a check-digit at the end. Since January 1, 2007, ISBN numbers are 13 digits (including the check digit). All 10-digit ISBNs can be converted to the newer 13-digit ISBNs. The ISBNdb project provides a public database to look up book information based on the ISBN number.

ISBN numbers in the Flutopedia citations below are provided in both the 10-digit and 13-digit formats, where provided by the publisher. Note that some ISBN numbers, as provided by the publisher, are not valid (typically because the check-digit at the end is not correct). In this case, (invalid ISBN) is indicated.

Valid ISBN numbers are linked to the ISBNdb.com database so that additional information on the publication appears in a separate browser window.

The ISSN system uses an 8-digit number, including a check-digit at the end. See the ISSN International Center for more information. ISSN numbers are provided in the citations below, where available. The EISSN system uses the same 8-digit format as the ISSN system.

UPC and EAN Citations

The UPC (“Universal Product Code”) system allows products to be uniquely identified by encoding 12 digit numbers as scanable bar codes on product packages.

The EAN (“European Article Number”, now renamed EAN-13) system is system with similar intent that uses 13 digit numbers.

UPC and EAN numbers in the Flutopedia citations below are shown as provided by the publisher. Note that some UPC and EAN numbers, as provided by the publisher, are not valid (typically because the check-digit at the end is not correct). In this case, (invalid UPC) or (invalid EAN) is indicated.

Valid UPC and EAN numbers are linked to the external databases so that additional information on the publication appears in a separate browser window.

DOI Citations

The system of DOI® (“Digital Object Identifier”) citations was developed by the International DOI Foundation as an aid to managing published works in a digital environment.

DOIs in the citations below are linked to http://dx.doi.org/ so that when you click on them, the publisher's information about that publication is displayed in a separate browser window.

ASIN Citations

An ASIN (“Amazon Standard Identification Number”) is a unique identification number assigned by Amazon.com and its partners for product identification within the Amazon.com organization. I provide ASIN number, where possible, as an aid to locating additional information about a reference. The use of ASIN numbers on Flutopedia is not a recommendation for the use of the commercial services of Amazon.com.

ASIN numbers in the citations below are linked to http://amazon.com/ so that when you click on them, the specific page from Amazon.com for that item is displayed in a separate browser window.

Google Scholar

An of version 3.06 (April 1, 2013), direct searches on Google Scholar are provided for each reference, using the Search Google Scholar tag. These searches open in a new window.

Alternate Citation Formats

An of version 3.23 (September 2013), alternate formats for all citations are available. Please see the Alternate Citation Formats page.

 
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